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Home > Magazine > Guns > Folk Art Firearms

Folk Art Firearms
February 19, 2013

It's still what I want to do. I went to the local Mason Gun Show last week and had a dandy time.

It's like visiting a gun museum, seeing all the variety of firearms both new, used and collectible. There is also a ton of nifty accessories, like reloaders and bullet-casters plus vintage books and military surplus luggage. A pleasant outing. And a popular one, too, by the lines around the block on the first days. I took one look and left and came back near the end of the last day.

A couple dealers told me it was their biggest show yet due to the likely impending gun restrictions. They said that everyone certainly sold the "black plastic" guns hard but that the gun show was just plain more popular right now, with folks buying more of everything, new and old.

Anyway, I tend to be most attracted to the $50-100 singleshot shotguns. One of these days I'll start gathering up a few and get modifying them to be folk art guns. I saw a couple different guns there sporting a nifty trick called the Rope Burn -- you wind a burlap rope or cloth around the gun then lightly torch the exposed wood. The rope protects the wood under it. The result is a zebra stripe woodburn effect. Kinda dominating, I suppose.

I'd like to try some more creative woodburning, as with an iron tool. Also carving and checkering.

...Make me a "Great Spirit" shotgun.

Basically, I envision starting cheap and seeing if I get any takers. Of course, I'll start with myself and see if I can create something I like! But first of all I'll practice on rough rounded junk wood of a similar nature. I'll work up both the designs and the skills.

My view is that an artful gun doesn't have to be "fancy" or expensive. It can have a personal message or a generally appropriate scene of some kind. I might also use thumb-tacks like the Indians did back in the day. Might also attach some fringe or flagging.

I suppose a removable sling and even a handy pouch to stow the gun easily in some fashion (out of the weather and in transport) would be cool. The pouch would go into the Possibles Bag while the gun is in action. And my Nordic Messenger Bag makes for a *mighty fine* possibles bag.

...One thing leads to another, eh?

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