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Home > Magazine > Trap > Fur Catching on Again?

Fur Catching on Again?
March 20, 2013

I've seen notices about how fur is now part of hipster culture. How is that? Is it coming from vintage, re-use? I've also seen mention of roadkill fur. Maybe those vectors put fur into an affordable class. ?

Fur = monster no longer seems the trendy equation.

Folks might even come around again to the idea that fur-trapping is humane and sustainable. Coz it is.

Organic and free-range meat is catching on. ...But fur lasts a lot longer than a meal.

In trapping an animal is restrained for a few hours or is drowned or killed in a minute or less, depending on the type of trapping. In terms of wild living these are humane ways to die. Live free, die quick. Then the fur gets used for decades.

It seems like the trendy urban concern lately is more bad farm conditions. The death of animals is less the focus than the life conditions. In fur trapping the life is ideal and the death quick, and any restraint is relatively brief.

It's nothing that city folk like to consider much. But the worlds DO sometimes merge in various trends of fashion and function.

I personally think fur looks great and that it does mean a stand for animal husbandry. It implies a connection to nature. Sure, it's a "ruler" and "apex predator" connection, but I think it's definitely sustainable.

My angle is I consider trapping to be like farming the forest. Or, it compares to hunting like netting fish compares to taking them one at a time. To me, trapping is above hunting and netting is above line-fishing. All are properly and readily done in consideration of conservation and humaneness.

i suppose issues get mingled. Here it's mainly fashion I'm wondering about. (Synthetic coats bring up questions of oil/plastics/toxins sustainability and enviro impact, of course. As well as questions of quality and durability.)



It's possibly also a food source. Muskrats are perhaps the furbearer most often eaten. I haven't tried them but would certainly consider it. I do like eating squirrels.

I note that watery or waterside critters are killed instantly in bodygrip traps or drowned in less than a minute. Land based predators are the ones held for a few hours in foothold traps. When caught the foot goes numb but usually isn't broken or permanently damaged if released. The trapping industry has interacted and compromised with humane concerns and produced traps over the years that have less and less impact on a foot.

What happens to animals in nature might be of interest. Their deaths are generally considered to be more drastic or are more drawn-out by far than with trapping. ...Injury and disease plus missing limbs then being eaten alive. Neither nature nor animal husbandry are always pretty, but the wild lives of furbearers seems relevant in a way.

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